Home

Sitemap

About

Next

Results and Discussion

Frequency
Hz
Onset
Minutes
Peak
Minutes
End
Minutes
Peak
Strength
Reading
Ability
0 8 10 >112 weak fair-good
0.1 2-5 16-34 >141 very strong poor
0.2 7 7-27 43 very weak normal
0.3 9 26-52 >166 medium strong fair-good
0.5 6 23 73 medium fair
1 2 19 120 strong poor
2 4 10 >67 medium poor
5 6 20 >67 medium fair-good
10 6 30 101 very strong fair
20 14 32 64 weak normal

Blind Tests 1-07-2010 to 1-26-2011

The table above summarizes the results from the first series of tests. The CDs were used in the following order:

1Hz, 0Hz, 2Hz, 0.2Hz, 5Hz, 10Hz, 20Hz, 0.3Hz, 0.1Hz, 0.5Hz

Here are a few notebook pages to give an idea of how I recorded the data:

CD#2     0Hz, control. Note the comment about the DC offsets.
CD#6     10Hz, comparable effects to permanent magnet devices documented on this site that ran at similar speeds.
CD #9     0.1Hz, this was done next to last.

As can be seen, results of the first study were not as clean as I had hoped. I suspected that spurious effects were taking place for a variety of reasons. On some trials I switched on the DC bias fields inside the machine, and on others when I was outside (see CD#2). Another source of transients was the AM demodulator, which caused large spikes when the carrier started and stopped. A special test CD with a carrier that switched on and off every 2 seconds, for a total of 2 minutes, caused a very strong mental effect.

After the second series of trials were completed, I added ON-OFF switches (outlined here in green) inside the machine for the E-W and N-S Helmholtz coils. A new wavefile has a 30 second carrier leader at the beginning to allow time to switch on the coils after the LED lights up, but before the signal begins. The N-S bias is now recorded on the CD, instead of being switched on manually, and the signal begins and ends with the field pointing north. Thus, the current to the coils begins and ends at zero, and there are no rapid changes in magnetic field strength.

I plan to run the next series of trials with the vertical coils disconnected. Magnetically, this would be equivalent to spinning around here in Jupiter, Florida, rather than at the equator as the previous trials were conducted. Before I use the vertical coils again in a controlled trial, I will add a potentiometer to ramp the field up and down very slowly, instead of just switching it on and off.

Despite these concerns, the 2 studies completed so far clearly demonstrate an effect at low rotation speeds. The second trial used just 2 conditions, a 0Hz control, and a 2 minute 0.08-0.6Hz sweep. The results were much more robust than the first series:
   

Frequency
Hz
Onset
Minutes
Peak
Minutes
End
Minutes
Peak
Strength
Reading
Ability
0 3 35 56 weak normal
0.08-0.6 4 39 113 very strong good
0.08-0.6 4 48 89 strong poor
0.08-0.6 4 30 78 very strong fair
0 40 - 67 very weak -
0 - - - none normal
0 3 19 >106 very strong good
0.08-0.6 5 39 >113 strong normal
0.08-0.6 - - - none normal
0 26 75 95 weak good

Blind Tests  2-08-2010 to 6-14-2010

The rotation speeds of the second series are well within the turning rates achievable by humans while standing upright. Certainly young people can turn much faster. Many experiments conducted by me on volunteers over the last 8 years with permanent magnet devices indicate that the majority of people respond to slowly moving magnetic fields. It is highly unlikely that the effects are caused by induced electric fields, because at rotation rates below 1Hz the field is only a few micro-volts/meter. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves microscopic magnetic particles, as has been shown in birds and other animals.

So far I have not found any easily measured physiological effects, such as blood pressure or pulse rate, that are altered by the oscillating magnetic field. With permanent magnet devices at frequencies of 5 -10Hz there is sometimes a visible slackening of the face or slight crepitation of the neck vertebrae, indicating a loss of muscle tension. This might be measurable with specialized equipment.